Author Topic: CalcImage Quantitative X-ray Mapping Examples  (Read 12182 times)

John Donovan

  • Administrator
  • Emeritus
  • *****
  • Posts: 2632
  • Other duties as assigned...
    • Probe Software
Re: CalcImage Quantitative X-ray Mapping Examples
« Reply #15 on: June 26, 2019, 04:59:11 am »
Here is a pdf of my presentation yesterday on quantitative x-ray mapping for WDS EPMA (see attached file below if you are logged in).
john
John J. Donovan, Pres. 
(541) 343-3400

"Not Absolutely Certain, Yet Reliable"

John Donovan

  • Administrator
  • Emeritus
  • *****
  • Posts: 2632
  • Other duties as assigned...
    • Probe Software
Re: CalcImage Quantitative X-ray Mapping Examples
« Reply #16 on: January 15, 2020, 11:01:43 am »
We recently upgraded from Golden Software's Surfer 15 to Surfer 17.

One can choose the 32 bit version or the 64 bit version to install. We choose the 64 bit version. Interestingly the default installation folder that the Surfer installer offers you is "Surfer" as opposed to previous versions which always appended the Surfer version number to the folder by default, e.g., "Surfer 11" or "Surfer 15". We left the default installation folder as "Surfer" and proceeded with the installation which went fine.

Then we launched CalcImage and opened some existing maps, the first in Cameca (cartesian) stage mode as seen here for this alloy quantitative map in elemental weight percent:



and next in JEOL (anti-cartesian) stage orientation as seen here in this Mt St. Helens feldspar in oxide weight percent:



Bottom line, it appears that the CalcImage presentation output scripting still all works in the latest version (17) of Golden Software's Surfer app.
John J. Donovan, Pres. 
(541) 343-3400

"Not Absolutely Certain, Yet Reliable"

John Donovan

  • Administrator
  • Emeritus
  • *****
  • Posts: 2632
  • Other duties as assigned...
    • Probe Software
Re: CalcImage Quantitative X-ray Mapping Examples
« Reply #17 on: January 22, 2020, 12:10:14 pm »
We did some additional testing using the latest Surfer 17 from Golden Software, checking that the interactive "slicing" features all still work and it looks like they work as expected.

Here for illustration, is a slice through a zircon showing the uranium distribution, first using traditional off-peak measurements:



And here is the same acquisition, but processed using the MAN background correction:



And you can see, the MAN processed data has better precision, and even more importantly for x-ray map acquisitions, acquiring this map would have taken only 1/2 the acquisition time, since one only needs to acquire an on-peak x-ray map when using MAN!
John J. Donovan, Pres. 
(541) 343-3400

"Not Absolutely Certain, Yet Reliable"

Probeman

  • Emeritus
  • *****
  • Posts: 2079
  • Never sleeps...
    • John Donovan
Re: CalcImage Quantitative X-ray Mapping Examples
« Reply #18 on: January 30, 2020, 09:03:23 am »
I promised our EPMA students I would post this quant x-ray map they produced last quarter (better late than never I guess!):





15 keV, 30 nA, 100 ms per pixel
« Last Edit: February 02, 2020, 10:40:21 am by Probeman »
The only stupid question is the one not asked!

John Donovan

  • Administrator
  • Emeritus
  • *****
  • Posts: 2632
  • Other duties as assigned...
    • Probe Software
Re: CalcImage Quantitative X-ray Mapping Examples
« Reply #19 on: May 30, 2020, 11:12:35 am »
Here's a recent map our lab did on what I think is a granite.

Question to the geologists: I'm aware of what "graphic" granite looks like in hand specimen, but are the textures visible in these maps, an example of "micro graphic" granite?





John J. Donovan, Pres. 
(541) 343-3400

"Not Absolutely Certain, Yet Reliable"

macosta

  • Graduate
  • **
  • Posts: 9
Re: CalcImage Quantitative X-ray Mapping Examples
« Reply #20 on: May 30, 2020, 04:46:22 pm »
I'd say so - there is a subtle difference probably not worth arguing over between a micrographic texture (properly microcrysts of skeletal quartz hosted in alkali feldspar or sodic plagioclase) and between granophyre  (angular intergrowths of quartz and alkali feldspar). Generally, micrographic textures are more well-defined than granophyre, but both are thought to indicate eutectic crystallization.

Personally, micrographic qz looks blebbier to me than does granophyric qz, so I would call it a granophyre.

The distinction is somewhat arbitrary though.

Here is a catalogue of graphic textures in thin section:
http://www.alexstrekeisen.it/english/pluto/graphic.php

Compared to granophyric textures in thin section:
http://www.alexstrekeisen.it/english/pluto/granophyric.php
« Last Edit: May 30, 2020, 06:56:38 pm by John Donovan »
Marisa D. Acosta

John Donovan

  • Administrator
  • Emeritus
  • *****
  • Posts: 2632
  • Other duties as assigned...
    • Probe Software
Re: CalcImage Quantitative X-ray Mapping Examples
« Reply #21 on: May 30, 2020, 06:56:16 pm »
Thanks Marisa!

Also, I love the technical term "blebbier".  And I mean that sincerely since apparently "blebbier" is found in a published textbook on Geology:

https://books.google.com/books?id=N7SWDwAAQBAJ&pg=PA175&lpg=PA175&dq=blebbier&source=bl&ots=kn38RpzLqb&sig=ACfU3U3kxm023Pj796RJ3H2RnyhJovPRWw&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj5z4TT_tzpAhWwGTQIHbYGDmQQ6AEwBHoECAoQAQ#v=onepage&q=blebbier&f=false

Nice.   :)
John J. Donovan, Pres. 
(541) 343-3400

"Not Absolutely Certain, Yet Reliable"

macosta

  • Graduate
  • **
  • Posts: 9
Re: CalcImage Quantitative X-ray Mapping Examples
« Reply #22 on: May 30, 2020, 09:46:58 pm »
It's actually a legitimate mineralogical descriptor: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bleb_(mineralogy)
Marisa D. Acosta

John Donovan

  • Administrator
  • Emeritus
  • *****
  • Posts: 2632
  • Other duties as assigned...
    • Probe Software
Re: CalcImage Quantitative X-ray Mapping Examples
« Reply #23 on: May 30, 2020, 10:59:39 pm »
It's actually a legitimate mineralogical descriptor: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bleb_(mineralogy)

Cool. And blebbier is the adjective!   :)
John J. Donovan, Pres. 
(541) 343-3400

"Not Absolutely Certain, Yet Reliable"