Author Topic: Light Element Crystal Refractive Index Values  (Read 24691 times)

Mike Matthews

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Re: Light Element Crystal Refractive Index Values
« Reply #30 on: December 05, 2015, 01:11:02 AM »
In case anyone wants hand-crank some energy to spec positions conversions:

  WDj = (24.792 x R)/(2d x E) or E = (24.792 x R)/(2d x WDj)

  WDc = (12.3986 x 100000)/(2d x E) or E = (12.3986 x 100000)/(2d x WDc)

Which means that:

  WDj = 0.0028 x WDc or WDc = 357.143 x WDj

To convert between wavelength and energy:

  L = 12.3986/L or L = 12.3986/E

where

  WDj and WDc are the JEOL and Cameca spectrometer positions respectively,
  R is the Rowland circle radius in mm (160 for Cameca and 140 for all three JEOL spectrometers),
  2d is the crystal lattice spacing in A,
  E is the X-Ray energy in keV
  L is the X-Ray wavelength in A
« Last Edit: December 05, 2015, 08:10:55 AM by John Donovan »

Probeman

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Re: Light Element Crystal Refractive Index Values
« Reply #31 on: December 05, 2015, 08:18:46 AM »
And if you've ever wondered where the constant 12.3986 (or so) comes from...

The only stupid question is the one not asked!

sckuehn

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Re: Light Element Crystal Refractive Index Values
« Reply #32 on: December 08, 2015, 11:51:24 AM »
How about adding the old school 127 mm Rowland circle from the ARL SEMQ?

Probeman

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Re: Light Element Crystal Refractive Index Values
« Reply #33 on: December 08, 2015, 01:26:24 PM »
How about adding the old school 127 mm Rowland circle from the ARL SEMQ?

Hi Steve,
Sorry, starting in v. 10 of my software I removed all the ARL constants from my software- and you know what?  I'm not going to add them back in!

Sorry.   :(
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Probeman

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Re: Light Element Crystal Refractive Index Values
« Reply #34 on: July 10, 2017, 01:45:56 PM »
Thanks for the summary Owen, that's excellent.

John, my understanding is that both the JEOL and Cameca crystals come from the same supplier, they just name them differently, so the following are direct equivalents:

PC3 = LDE3
PC25 = LDEB
PC2 = LDE2
PC1 = LDE1
PC0 = LDE45

I'm not sure which PC, if any, is equivalent to LDE6 though.

I'm trying to remember the compositions of these multi-layers. I seem to remember that:

PC0 and PC1 are W/Si
PC2 is Ni/C
PC3 is Mo/B4C

I have a PC2.5 which is also Mo/B4C.
john
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Anette von der Handt

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Re: Light Element Crystal Refractive Index Values
« Reply #35 on: July 10, 2017, 03:38:35 PM »
One more overview, building on various literature, my notes and previous answers:


Cameca                  JEOL           d-spacing           Material
name                     name          (nm)

PC0                          -                 4.5                  W/Si
PC1                        LDE1             6                     W/Si
PC2                        LDE2           10                     Ni/C
PC3                        LDE3           20                     Mo/B4C
PC2.5/LBoron          LDEB           14.5                  Mo/B4C (careful: up to 0.5 wt% B2O3 fluorescence)
LNitrogen                LDE5             8                     Cr/Sc (careful: absorption edge under N)
      ?                      LDE6           12                     Cr/C

They all come from Ovonic/Ovonyx (now part of Rigaku) in Michigan*.

I wonder if there is C fluorescence from the LDE6 as well. Has anyone ever checked/seen that?


----
*From their web page: Ovonyx™ multilayer optics are the most popular light element X-ray analyzers for all wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) attachments used on SEMs and in electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Ovonyx Analyzers are sold to most major X-ray spectrometer manufacturers around the world including Cameca, Jeol, Oxford, Shimadzu, and Thermo Noran.

Current offerings:
Product series       Available 2d spacings       Primary elements    Secondary elements       Notes
"A"                       60Å                               F,O                       N      
"E"                       90Å                               N             
"N"                       80Å & 100Å               O,C,B               N      
"C"                       100Å                       C                       B                         no O interface
"H"                       145Å & 200Å               B                       Be      
"Y"                       145Å & 200Å               B                       Be                         Intensity ≥ 130%
                                                                                                                                           of H Series

I am curious about details on series "E"..
« Last Edit: July 10, 2017, 03:46:56 PM by Anette von der Handt »
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Anette von der Handt

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Re: Light Element Crystal Refractive Index Values
« Reply #36 on: July 10, 2017, 05:01:10 PM »
Yes, LDEC seems to be an old name for LDE2. I found this: LDEC: 9.8 nm; Ni/C Layered Synthetic; Low High B-O (Kα), optimized for C analysis.

I never heard of LDE4 but I guess it must exist just for logical reasons (LDE1-6).

I would still say the Cameca equivalent to LDE5 is the LNitrogen (they offer this).

Cameca also has a Li-capable monochromator out now (see Goldschmidt 2017 abstract).
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Anette von der Handt

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Re: Light Element Crystal Refractive Index Values
« Reply #37 on: July 11, 2017, 03:34:37 PM »
I asked Pete McSwiggen about the LDE4. This is what he said:

"In regards to the LDE4 crystal, they used to have a LDE4H.  However, it seems to have been dropped as an option back at least at the beginning of the 8200 era.  I do not know what happened to it, but since it is no longer offered, I assume it was an under performer."

We can quiz JEOL at M&M and maybe find out more. I am also curious why they don't offer an equivalent to PC0.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2017, 03:42:12 PM by Anette von der Handt »
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Julien

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Re: Light Element Crystal Refractive Index Values
« Reply #38 on: January 07, 2019, 05:25:40 AM »
Has anyone tested / calculated the actual 2d spacing of their monochromator? How accurate are the value provided by JEOL and Cameca? How about the refractive index? Is it fixed and physically determined in each material, or is it variable from monochromator to monochromator (or even from instrument to instrument???)?

Cheers,

Julien

Probeman

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Re: Light Element Crystal Refractive Index Values
« Reply #39 on: January 07, 2019, 08:28:30 AM »
Has anyone tested / calculated the actual 2d spacing of their monochromator? How accurate are the value provided by JEOL and Cameca? How about the refractive index? Is it fixed and physically determined in each material, or is it variable from monochromator to monochromator (or even from instrument to instrument???)?

Cheers,

Julien

Hi Julien,
Good questions.  Yes, John Fournelle has done this.

See the PPT attached to this post (need to login to see attachments):

https://probesoftware.com/smf/index.php?topic=197.msg1732#msg1732

Also yes, the refractive index is determined by the composition and layer thicknesses of the multi-layer material. 

This window in CalcZAF allows one to see the effect of the refractive index on the spectrometer position:

https://probesoftware.com/smf/index.php?topic=598.msg4347#msg4347

The "K index" is the refractive index from the CRYSTALS.DAT file in the ProgramData\Probe Software\Probe for EPMA folder. 

john
« Last Edit: January 07, 2019, 09:56:39 AM by Probeman »
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Anette von der Handt

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Re: Light Element Crystal Refractive Index Values
« Reply #40 on: January 07, 2019, 12:37:37 PM »
JEOL provides an inspection certificate stating the d-spacing for each LDE monochromator installed but not their refractive index. The values can vary quite a bit from machine to machine and crystal to crystal in my experience.

For example, on my new machine I have LDE1: 6.04 nm; LDE2: 9.86 nm; LDE6L: 11.86 nm. I have somewhere values from some other instruments. Let's see what I can dig up.

I haven't had a chance to cross-check mine yet but will report back what I find when I get to it.
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JohnF

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Re: Light Element Crystal Refractive Index Values
« Reply #41 on: March 08, 2022, 09:22:19 AM »
I have been asked to add my 2 cents here...

Recall that one typically peaks on an element of interest on a specific spectrometer bearing a specific crystal. Say F Ka on a nominal 45 A 2d diffraction. Thus the software will “automatically” set the spectrometer position, correctly showing the F Ka peak at the “published” position (whether sin theta, mm, A or eV). 2d and K refraction value are essentially non-observable. The point of having a correct 2d with correct K refraction value are that when one wishes to see higher order markers, they will fall in the right place. That is what I found years ago with the SX51 and good old PfW v9 (still running it on SX51).

A test to tell me if this is relevant. With say 60A diffractor, peak on O Ka on an aluminosilicate. Then in PHA mode integral, do a detailed slow wavescan,  for whole spectrometer range, and see if the 3rd order higher order peak markers for Al and Si (and maybe other elements too) line up with the observed peaks. If they do, hurrah, and no need to do anything. If they don’t, then 2d and K need some adjustment.

John