Author Topic: ProbeLab ReImager  (Read 159 times)

Probeman

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ProbeLab ReImager
« on: March 18, 2021, 11:32:21 AM »
Noah Kraft and Anette von der Handt's article on a new application for batch exporting and annotating images from Thermo Pathfinder software is available now in Microscopy Today:

Software Development

Probelab ReImager: An Open-Source Software for Streamlining Image Processing in an Electron Microscopy Laboratory

Noah Kraft, Anette von der Handt, pp. 38-41
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NicholasRitchie

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Re: ProbeLab ReImager
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2021, 04:22:17 AM »
It's really great to see members of the community developing tools to extend the capabilities of the vendor's software (like for example PfE).  From what I've seen at QMA-2019, ReImager looks like a really nice tool.  JavaScript was likely a good choice to allow Windows, Linux and Mac users.  Annette, will the code be Open Sourced to allow other to help with the development?
« Last Edit: March 19, 2021, 08:40:58 AM by John Donovan »
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Anette von der Handt

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Re: ProbeLab ReImager
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2021, 08:31:06 AM »
Hi Nicholas,

Thanks for the kind words. We are happy if the community will find this useful.

Yes, the code is available on Github through the webpage and licensed under MIT copyright license: https://reimager.probelab.net/

As Probeman said (thanks for posting) the article in Microscopy today is out and gives some more information and some examples:  https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/microscopy-today/article/probelab-reimager-an-opensource-software-for-streamlining-image-processing-in-an-electron-microscopy-laboratory/0162C9669FACF28562C57672D3B62789

Check out the web version of Figure 2 in the article to see the difference in image quality by using ReImager. Also, the way opacity in X-ray map stacks is treated is turning out to be very useful.

Having a simple program for image annotation that also runs on a Mac has been really useful during the pandemic to say the least.
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