Probe Software Users Forum

General EPMA => Discussion of General EPMA Issues => Topic started by: John Donovan on May 04, 2017, 12:37:25 PM

Title: History of EPMA
Post by: John Donovan on May 04, 2017, 12:37:25 PM
I'm starting a new topic on the history of EPMA instruments and whatever else (software, people, etc.) that we want to talk about.

I'll start with some comments I made in response to Paul's mention of the shaw.dat k-ratio measurements which were apparently made on a MAC EPMA instrument long, long ago (fortunately the glass materials seem to still be available for new measurements).

Secondly. These measurements were made either on an ARL or the MAC probe and are subject to discussion regarding the instrumental stability in the case of the ARL (and takeoff angle not directly comparable to all other measurements made at 40 deg), and in the case of the MAC, non-normal beam incidence.

Since the ARL (SEMQ) was known for it's relatively high 52.5 deg takeoff angle (it was my first EPMA instrument when I arrived at at UC Berkeley), I'm guessing that the 38.5 degrees in the shaw.dat file means these measurements were done on a MAC probe?   I never saw one of these instruments myself, but if I google "MAC EPMA 38.5", the first search result returned is a talk by a guy named Paul Carpenter that gave a presentation at UofO in 2007 entitled "Electron-Probe Microanalysis: Instrumental Calibration, Standards, Quantitative Analysis, and Problem Systems":

http://epmalab.uoregon.edu/Workshop2/Carpenter_Oregon_Workshop_2007.pdf

It's only 118 slides long, so just a brief overview!  But in scanning through it I find results on slide 33 from the "Shaw" dataset measured on a MAC probe with a takeoff angle of 38.5 degrees.  I also found a link to a talk by John Fournelle that mentions the ARL EMX and MAC instruments from 1960 on slide 27:

www.geology.wisc.edu/~johnf/g777/ppt/10_Historical_Development.ppt

So I guess the EMX and MAC instruments were both made by ARL prior to their SEMQ model? 
john

Then Paul responded:

Thanks for reminding me about the MAC takeoff angle of 38.5 degrees. ARL did not mfg. the MAC probe. I think it stands for Materials Analysis Corporation.

Cheers,

Paul
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: John Donovan on May 04, 2017, 12:46:31 PM
Interesting.  It makes sense because I seem to remember now that the EMX probe was what ARL manufactured before the SEMQ. I think I even saw one once "in the wild", but can't remember where.  Does anyone know what takeoff angle the EMX had? 

Oregon may have had a MAC probe at one time.  After I arrived here I found a standard mount labeled "MAC standards".  I attach a drawing of the unusual layout below.

I'm more familiar with the subsequent history of the ARL SEMQ.  ARL was eventually bought by Bausch & Lomb, then split and sold off to Shimadzu and Advanced Microbeam. Shimadzu still sells new EPMA instruments in Japan (and China also). And they all have a 52.5 degree takeoff angle!
john
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: John Donovan on May 04, 2017, 12:49:16 PM
Then Anette responded:

Thanks for reminding me about the MAC takeoff angle of 38.5 degrees. ARL did not mfg. the MAC probe. I think it stands for Materials Analysis Corporation.
Paul

Yes, ARL did not manufacture the MAC probe but both came out of California apparently.

Wittry (2001, M&M) has much more information on the MAC probes, started in 1960 by Macres, who studied under Ogilvie at the MIT: "The competitive pressure forced on the industry by ARL with its high take-off angle, dictated that new instruments also have a high take-off angle. However, ARL’s inverted lens design was patented, so the MAC 400 achieved its 38.5-degree take-off angle by inclining the sample. Many of the leaders in the microprobe community strongly objected to the use of an inclined sample, as all the quantitative algorithms were either developed or substantiated using normal electron beam incidence on the specimen."

The University of Minnesota had a MAC probe at one time and I still have one spectrometer. For fun, here is a list of commercial sources for EPMA, coming out of an ASTM booklet from 1972.
Anette
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: John Donovan on May 04, 2017, 12:53:51 PM
Anette also wrote:

Does any one know what takeoff angle the EMX had?

It was also 52.5. I attached the Wittry paper that goes into all the details of the various spectrometer designs very nicely.

Oregon may have had a MAC probe at one time.  After I arrived here I found a standard mount labeled "MAC standards".  I attach a drawing of the unusual layout below.

Thank you for that layout! I have the exact same standard block! Except that the Be was killed before my time and then I killed the Mg and Mn metal unfortunately (and I am still looking for advice how to best re-polish this mount with a wide range of hardnesses).

Shimadzu still sells new EPMA instruments in Japan (and China also). And they all have a 52.5 degree takeoff angle!
john

They are also now on the American market. They have a "show room" Shimadzu Lab in Arlington, Texas (http://www.uta.edu/sirt/cefms/equipment/EPMA/EPMA.php) and someone bought one at least in Brazil (?).

Anette
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: John Donovan on May 05, 2017, 11:08:57 PM
Hi Anette,
How right you are about polishing a standard block with material hardnesses that range from from Al2O3 to Au!

The only person I can think to ask is Tim Teague at UC Berkeley.  He can polish anything.  He's close to retirement so don't hesitate to contact him!
john
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: Karsten Goemann on October 24, 2017, 02:09:47 AM
Hi John, could your MAC standard block also be from these guys:

http://www.macstandards.co.uk
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: John Donovan on October 24, 2017, 10:26:42 AM
Hi John, could your MAC standard block also be from these guys:

http://www.macstandards.co.uk

Hi Karsten,
Interesting.

I'll bet you are correct!
john
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: Probeman on November 20, 2017, 02:55:48 PM
You learn something new everyday!

One of my students asked why the element fluorine has the same root as fluorescence.  So we did some wiki searches and found that the word fluorescence comes from the Latin word "fluo" which means "to flow". 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorescence

Now why would that be?  Well it turns out that the word fluorescence originates from the fact that the mineral fluorite was one of the first minerals that fluorescence was observed in!  Due to REEs apparently.  But why "to flow"?  Well, because fluorite was used as an early "flux" material (note the same root!) to remove oxides to lower the melting point when smelting ores and brazing metals.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorite

And what does this have to do with fluorine?  Well of course fluorite was the first material from which fluorine was attempted to be isolated from (dangerous work!).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorine

I wish I could have said that my high school Latin came in handy but I've forgotten more than I remember!
john
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: Anette von der Handt on February 14, 2018, 02:14:34 PM
Hi John, could your MAC standard block also be from these guys:

http://www.macstandards.co.uk

Hi Karsten,
Interesting.

I'll bet you are correct!
john

I don't think so. I have the exact same standard block (elements and layout) and it definitely predates MAC Ltd (founded in 1981 according to their webpage).

To my knowledge, it was a standard block that came with the MAC400 electron microprobe.
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: Anette von der Handt on February 14, 2018, 02:17:14 PM
When I was hunting for some old papers I found ads for various electron microprobes among the digitized content. Maybe someone else finds them as enjoyable as me. Mostly from the 60'ies and 70'ies.

First comes some ARL....
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: Anette von der Handt on February 14, 2018, 02:17:54 PM
and some more ARL....
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: Anette von der Handt on February 14, 2018, 04:10:33 PM
and then some Cameca. If anyone has anything else (JEOL, MAC etc) I would be very interested.
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: Probeman on February 14, 2018, 04:27:39 PM
Hi Anette,
These ads are a "blast from the past".  Thanks for posting them. 

I actually started on an ARL SEMQ at UC Berkeley in the mid 1980s as a mechanical technician.   It was an "interesting" instrument to say the least.  After a student managed to implode the vacuum chamber (let's call it an explosive depressurization, a long story), the electronics tech and I rebuilt it completely.  It was an education in EPMA I can tell you. It was after that when I realized the software needed to be improved. The rest is history as they say.

This isn't an ad, but it's the first Cameca MS85 EPMA (MS = MicroSonde) built in 1956 (see attached below- remember to login to see attachments).  We're both the same age...
john
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: Anette von der Handt on February 15, 2018, 04:26:29 PM
I forgot that I have one ad for JEOL too, unfortunately not for a microprobe but SEM. Still fun.
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: Probeman on February 15, 2018, 09:53:07 PM
I forgot that I have one ad for JEOL too, unfortunately not for a microprobe but SEM. Still fun.

100 angstroms resolution is 10 nm, so not bad for almost 50 years ago!
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: Anette von der Handt on February 27, 2018, 01:43:10 PM
This video is described as showing an electron probe magnifier from the 1960's. It might be an SEM though. Anyone can recognize a make/model? What is that rotating turret at the end?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i2oyzt98oc0
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: AndrewLocock on February 27, 2018, 04:03:19 PM
Hello,

A snapshot of the early history of electron microprobe manufacturers may be found in Table 18 of Beaman, D.R. & Isasi, J.A. (1972) Electron Beam Microanalysis. ASTM Special Technical Publication 506. This table (attached) lists the various manufacturers, their common acronyms, and then-current U.S. addresses.

A handy figure that shows the various takeoff angles for X-rays in many early instruments can be found in Figure 2 of Smith, D.G.W. & Rucklidge, J.C. (1973) Electron microprobe analysis in the earth sciences. Advances in Geophysics 16, 57-154. I have also attached this file to this post.

Cheers,
Andrew

Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: AndrewLocock on February 27, 2018, 04:25:57 PM
Further early history: 11 manufacturers (including MAC) are listed in the table given in Wittry, D.B. (1969) Recent Advances in Instrumentation for Microprobe Analysis. In: Möllenstedt G., Gaukler K.H. (eds) Vth International Congress on X-Ray Optics and Microanalysis. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. A copy in PDF format of the table is attached.
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: Probeman on March 03, 2018, 01:54:27 PM
I'm still enjoying reading "The Disappearing Spoon- and other true tales of madness, love, and the history of the world from the periodic table of the elements"- whew, long title.

There's the story of how Monte Carlo calculations came to be (named).  Basically Stanislaw Ulam who played solitaire card games starting wondering what the chances of winning any randomly dealt hand were. That led to discussions with John von Neumann about such calculations, when they realized that this idea could be applied to all sorts of problems with lots of random variables. After all quantum mechanics are strictly probabilistic.  And computers were just becoming able to handle these types of calculations.

The naming of this calculation method is not completely clear according to the author, but he states that "historically, the science of probabilities has roots in aristocratic casinos, and Ulam liked to brag that he named it in memory of an uncle who often borrowed money to gamble on the "well known generator of random integers (between zero and thirty six) in the Mediterranean principality"".
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: Jacob on October 14, 2018, 05:48:04 PM
I actually started on an ARL SEMQ at UC Berkeley in the mid 1980s as a mechanical technician.   It was an "interesting" instrument to say the least.  After a student managed to implode the vacuum chamber (let's call it an explosive depressurization, a long story), the electronics tech and I rebuilt it completely.  It was an education in EPMA I can tell you. It was after that when I realized the software needed to be improved. The rest is history as they say.

Looking at the new Shimadzu literature on their EPMA-1720, it looks like the spectrometers accept xrays from above the objective lens.  Were the ARL probes like that?  It's a very interesting design.  Does anybody else do it that way?
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: Probeman on October 15, 2018, 10:52:44 AM
I actually started on an ARL SEMQ at UC Berkeley in the mid 1980s as a mechanical technician.   It was an "interesting" instrument to say the least.  After a student managed to implode the vacuum chamber (let's call it an explosive depressurization, a long story), the electronics tech and I rebuilt it completely.  It was an education in EPMA I can tell you. It was after that when I realized the software needed to be improved. The rest is history as they say.

Looking at the new Shimadzu literature on their EPMA-1720, it looks like the spectrometers accept xrays from above the objective lens.  Were the ARL probes like that?  It's a very interesting design.  Does anybody else do it that way?

Hi Jacob,
Yes, it is an interesting design. Everyone else seems to have settled on a 40 degree takeoff angle accepting x-rays from underneath the objective lens. The ARL/Shimadzu was designed that way to obtain a very high takeoff angle of 52.5 degrees (if you've ever seen this angle and wondered where it comes from, it's from the ARL/Shimadzu design).  One advantage is smaller matrix corrections, for example F Ka in CaF2 at 40 degrees:

SAMPLE: 32767, TOA: 40, ITERATIONS: 0, Z-BAR: 14.64681

 ELEMENT  ABSCOR  FLUCOR  ZEDCOR  ZAFCOR STP-POW BKS-COR   F(x)u      Ec   Eo/Ec    MACs
   Ca ka  1.0024  1.0000  1.0134  1.0158  1.0505   .9646   .9606  4.0390  3.7138 153.760
   F  ka  3.2329   .9998   .9795  3.1661   .9449  1.0366   .2318   .6870 21.8341 6822.03

 ELEMENT   K-RAW K-VALUE ELEMWT% OXIDWT% ATOMIC% FORMULA KILOVOL                                       
   Ca ka  .00000  .50536  51.335   -----  33.333   1.000   15.00                                       
   F  ka  .00000  .15371  48.665   -----  66.667   2.000   15.00                                       
   TOTAL:                100.000   ----- 100.000   3.000

And here at 52.5 degrees:

SAMPLE: 32767, TOA: 52.5, ITERATIONS: 0, Z-BAR: 14.64681

 ELEMENT  ABSCOR  FLUCOR  ZEDCOR  ZAFCOR STP-POW BKS-COR   F(x)u      Ec   Eo/Ec    MACs
   Ca ka  1.0019  1.0000  1.0134  1.0153  1.0505   .9646   .9679  4.0390  3.7138 153.760
   F  ka  2.7944   .9998   .9795  2.7366   .9449  1.0366   .2825   .6870 21.8341 6822.03

 ELEMENT   K-RAW K-VALUE ELEMWT% OXIDWT% ATOMIC% FORMULA KILOVOL                                       
   Ca ka  .00000  .50559  51.335   -----  33.333   1.000   15.00                                       
   F  ka  .00000  .17783  48.665   -----  66.667   2.000   15.00                                       
   TOTAL:                100.000   ----- 100.000   3.000

This originally American designed/made instrument was innovative in several ways, but it also had some significant issues for example, very small Bragg crystals which was only partially compensated for by using a very small (127 mm) focal circle.  But the ability to have six tunable spectrometers is very attractive from an analytical perspective, if fact that is why Probe for EPMA still has the capability of handling six spectrometer instruments!
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: Probeman on November 30, 2018, 10:57:47 AM
I'm compiling a list of (dead) people that should be mentioned in the history of EPMA.

I have:
Hans Bethe (for electron energy loss)
J. J. Thompson (for discovery of the electron)
Wilhelm Röntgen (for the discovery of x-rays)
Henry Mosely (for discovery of atomic number and wavelength relationship)
Raimond Castaing (for invention of EPMA instrument and physical basis of matrix corrections)

Any others come to mind?
john
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: Owen Neill on November 30, 2018, 02:41:38 PM
John - you're list is going to be a long one, but for starters:

William Lawrence and William Henry Bragg (Braggs' Law)
Andre Guinier (Guinier XRD cameras and Castaing's PhD supervisor)
August Beer (X-ray attenuation)
Frans Michel Penning (cold-cathode vacuum gauges)
Max Planck (Planck's law)
Ernst Ruska/Max Knoll/Manfred von Ardenne (scanning electron beams)
Walter Schottky (Schottky effect)
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: Probeman on November 30, 2018, 03:37:48 PM
John - you're list is going to be a long one, but for starters:

William Lawrence and William Henry Bragg (Braggs' Law)
Andre Guinier (Guinier XRD cameras and Castaing's PhD supervisor)
August Beer (X-ray attenuation)
Frans Michel Penning (cold-cathode vacuum gauges)
Max Planck (Planck's law)
Ernst Ruska/Max Knoll/Manfred von Ardenne (scanning electron beams)
Walter Schottky (Schottky effect)

Doh!  Of course the Bragg father/son duo is sorta obvious.  Thanks!
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: John Donovan on December 08, 2018, 03:02:47 PM
John - you're list is going to be a long one, but for starters:

William Lawrence and William Henry Bragg (Braggs' Law)
Andre Guinier (Guinier XRD cameras and Castaing's PhD supervisor)
August Beer (X-ray attenuation)
Frans Michel Penning (cold-cathode vacuum gauges)
Max Planck (Planck's law)
Ernst Ruska/Max Knoll/Manfred von Ardenne (scanning electron beams)
Walter Schottky (Schottky effect)

OK, we added some more birthdays of famous people in EPMA to the "special greeting" list in Probe for EPMA.  There are several in December. Maybe you will find out who they are!
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: Probeman on January 07, 2019, 10:20:35 AM
I am saddened to receive this notice on the passing of Dr. Robert (Bob) Tracy:

Quote
Dear Faculty, Staff, and Students:

With great sadness, I must inform you that Dr. Bob Tracy passed away late last night.

Bob has been a stalwart of our department for many years, having served as both a professor and department head.  He was a generous colleague, a connoisseur of wine and monazite, a peerless microprobe-whisperer, and a selfless mentor to students and junior faculty alike.  He leaves a void that will be impossible to fill.

At the end, Bob’s wife Pat was with him, and he had been visited by several close friends from the department, including Mark and Kristie Caddick, Nancy Ross, and Maddy Schreiber.

While this is a sad day for our department, at an appropriate point in the future we will hold a memorial event that will celebrate Bob’s life and his many contributions to the Department of Geosciences, the College of Science, and Virginia Tech.

Steve

____________________________

W. Steven Holbrook
Professor and Head
Department of Geosciences
Virginia Tech
926 West Campus Drive
4044 Derring Hall MC 0420
Blacksburg, VA  24061

wstevenh@vt.edu
http://www.steveholbrook.com
540-231-6521 (voice)
Title: Bob Tracy R.I.P.
Post by: JohnF on January 11, 2019, 07:26:43 AM
Begin forwarded message:

From: Mark Caddick <caddick@VT.EDU>
Subject: Bob Tracy
Date: January 10, 2019 at 12:09:24 PM CST
To: <GEO-METAMORPHISM@JISCMAIL.AC.UK>
Reply-To: Metamorphic Studies Group <GEO-METAMORPHISM@JISCMAIL.AC.UK>, Mark Caddick <caddick@VT.EDU>

Dear All,

It is with profound sadness that we write to inform you of the loss of our friend and colleague Robert (Bob) Tracy, who died at his home in Blacksburg early on Sunday morning.  Bob is survived by his wife of 50 years, Patricia.

Bob was a metamorphic petrologist whose thinking always stemmed from the deepest understanding of mineral structure and chemistry, and from a delight in the beauty of phase equilibria.  He made important contributions to our understanding of the measurement and significance of chemical zoning in metamorphic minerals, of metamorphic phase equilibria, of the processes of crustal melting and the mineralogy of residual rocks, of the behavior of sulfur during metamorphism, of microprobe dating of monazite, and of the tectono-metamorphic evolution of New England.  More importantly, Bob was a generous colleague, an enthusiastic teacher, and a fiercely loyal friend to the petrologic community.

Bob was born in Washington, D.C., in 1944.  He obtained his A.B. degree from Amherst College in 1967 before receiving an M.S. from Brown University in 1970 for work that first introduced him to the Cortlandt Complex of New York State – rocks that he would continue to work on throughout his career.  Bob’s Ph.D. (1975) was from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst under the supervision of Peter Robinson, focusing on metamorphic reactions and partial melting in pelitic schists of the Quabbin Reservoir Area, MA.  He then moved to Harvard as a research fellow, during which time he published influential work with Alan Thompson on anatexis in pelitic rocks and inferring metamorphic histories from chemical zoning in garnet.  Bob moved to Yale in 1978 as an assistant and then associate professor and moved to Virginia Tech in 1986 as full professor.  Bob was a great departmental citizen, serving as Department Chair from 2005 and 2008 and as Associate Chair from 2012 to 2018, and devoted much time to looking after and nursing along aging electron microprobes from which he was able to extract phenomenal data.  He was also extremely active in professional societies, in particular the Geological Society of America, in which he assumed numerous leadership roles.

Despite Bob's substantial and diverse research and service contributions, he will be known to many students because of his co-authorship with Harvey Blatt on the second edition of the textbook "Petrology: Igneous, Sedimentary, and Metamorphic” (published 1985).  This landmark textbook was updated with Brent Owens and published in its 3rd edition as Blatt, Tracy and Owens in 2006. It is still in common use today.

Those who knew Bob well, or who have subscribed to this listserv for some time, will be aware of both the depth and the breadth of his knowledge.  He was a font of information, a walking encyclopedia of mineralogy, petrology, optical and electron microscopy, sample preparation, wine, french cuisine, European and American political history, fishing, barbecue (amongst many other topics).  Bob liked nothing more than using this information to help people, and students in particular, generally espousing his wisdom with a carefully pointed wit.  His generosity in terms of sharing his time, knowledge, ideas, data and opinion are difficult to equal.

He will be greatly missed,

Mark Caddick & Nancy Ross,

Department of Geosciences, Virginia Tech
########################################################################
Title: Re: EPMA History
Post by: Probeman on January 26, 2019, 12:34:05 PM
I think it's Peter Duncumb's birthday today:

(https://probesoftware.com/smf/gallery/395_26_01_19_12_31_59.png)
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: Probeman on March 15, 2021, 10:01:48 AM
Here's a photo I found recently that shows the ARL SEMQ that UC Berkeley purchased in the late 1970s at a trade show. Yes, the actual instrument which they got a discount on because it was a "prototype".

(https://probesoftware.com/smf/gallery/395_14_03_21_3_58_36.png)

My advice: never buy anything with a low serial number!

After the instrument had been destroyed by an errant airlock exchange valve decapitating the stage and imploding the diffusion pump thus spraying Fomblin fluid all over the electron column, light optics and WDS spectrometers, which then polymerized forming a hard plastic coating on everything, the electronics tech (George Engeman) and mechanical tech  (yours truly) were called in to disassemble, clean (in boiling methylene chloride!), and rebuild the instrument. Here is a photo of myself testing the new instrument still running on the trusty PDP-11 with 64K RAM:

(https://probesoftware.com/smf/gallery/395_14_03_21_4_14_38.png)

The PDP-11 and the (removable) 10 MB disk packs are seen in the lower left.

It was then we realized that we needed a better computer so here is the same mechanical technician after writing new software for the then recently released IBM AT PC with 10 times the memory (640K)!

(https://probesoftware.com/smf/gallery/395_14_03_21_4_15_37.png)

Remember "640K ought to be enough for anybody" sometimes attributed to Bill Gates.  The IBM PC can be seen behind the technician.

Also note the monocular light optics which was a modification, because the original binocular optics produced images of a slightly different sizes, which caused most users "wanging" headaches because the brain was trying to see them as the same size FOV.
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: jon_wade on March 15, 2021, 03:34:16 PM
cracking pictures - that ARL looks like how I imagined the future! and thats no Technician!

I don't know if anyone has pics, but the old Camebax we had in Bristol was held together by vacuum alone (there was a bet that someone, no names, might knock the 'power off' and the whole column collapse around them with comedy effect). 

I was quite fond of this old banger until I found  an old replacement green CRT screen in a box behind it. The screen (the imaging screen)  had been made in a factory that catastrophically blew up whilst I was working there. My mate had got me the job when I left school and, luckily for me, I was a bit hungover one morning and had sneaked off to the canteen for a bacon roll rather than checking on a vapour deposition process.  What my chum didn't tell me was that he had been blown up two years previously checking the same process.....  Anyway, thats why, if you needed a replacement CRT screen for a Camebax you couldn't get one for love nor money - I was hungover.
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: Probeman on March 16, 2021, 08:58:41 AM
Our Cameca SX50 came with special Sony "overlay" monitors that were originally built for the film industry.  They were used to display number of feet of film remaining, etc.   Cameca utilized them for displaying the WDS crystals and mag info.

I was happy to replace these old vacuum tube monitors with flat screens (using a homemade video overlay circuit), but at least the old Sony monitors never blew up on us!

https://probesoftware.com/smf/index.php?topic=173.msg752#msg752

Login to see the attachments which include our video display modifications in order to utilize flat screen monitors for the overlay video.
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: ericwgh on July 22, 2021, 01:55:45 AM
Who reported the first Earth Science material compositions by EPMA?

Anything older than this one?
STUMPFL, E.F. (1961). Some new platinum-rich minerals identified with the electron microanalyser. Mineralog Mag 32, 833–847

Many thanks
Eric
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: JonF on July 22, 2021, 04:23:01 AM
Who reported the first Earth Science material compositions by EPMA?

Anything older than this one?
STUMPFL, E.F. (1961). Some new platinum-rich minerals identified with the electron microanalyser. Mineralog Mag 32, 833–847

Many thanks
Eric

Looking at the Stumpfl article, it references Castaing's 1960 chapter Electron Probe Microanalysis in Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics (https://doi.org/10.1016/S0065-2539(08)60212-7). In that, there's a section on mineralogy that references some early work on earth science topics:

Guillemin, C. and Capitant, M., (1960) Utilisation de la microsonde électronique de Castaing pour des études minéralogiques, a report from the 21st international geological congress

Castaing, R., and Fredriksson, K., Analyses of cosmic spherules with an X-ray microanalyser Geochim. et Cosmhim. Acta 14, 114 (1958).
https://doi.org/10.1016/0016-7037(58)90099-1

Plus a couple from 1957 that I couldn't access.


Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: AndrewLocock on July 22, 2021, 09:16:12 AM
Who reported the first Earth Science material compositions by EPMA?

Anything older than this one?
STUMPFL, E.F. (1961). Some new platinum-rich minerals identified with the electron microanalyser. Mineralog Mag 32, 833–847

Many thanks
Eric

Looking at the Stumpfl article, it references Castaing's 1960 chapter Electron Probe Microanalysis in Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics (https://doi.org/10.1016/S0065-2539(08)60212-7). In that, there's a section on mineralogy that references some early work on earth science topics:

Guillemin, C. and Capitant, M., (1960) Utilisation de la microsonde électronique de Castaing pour des études minéralogiques, a report from the 21st international geological congress

Castaing, R., and Fredriksson, K., Analyses of cosmic spherules with an X-ray microanalyser Geochim. et Cosmhim. Acta 14, 114 (1958).
https://doi.org/10.1016/0016-7037(58)90099-1

Plus a couple from 1957 that I couldn't access.

A useful source of some of the early literature is:
B. Banerjee, "Classified Bibliography on Electron Probe X-Ray Microanalysis," in Symposium on Advances in Electron Metallography and Electron Probe Microanalysis, edited by Committee E-4 (West Conshohocken, PA: ASTM International, 10.1520/STP43687S), 207-1962. https://doi.org/978-0-8031-5971-6.
See "Microprobe Analysis, 3. Applications".

Birks & Brooks (1957) mention analysis of a copper-iron mineral and its inclusions, which is subsequently elaborated upon in Birks et al. (1959):
Birks, L.S. and Brooks, E.J., 1957. Electron Probe X‐Ray Microanalyzer. Review of Scientific Instruments, 28(9), pp.709-712.
https://aip.scitation.org/doi/pdf/10.1063/1.1715982
Birks, L.S., Brooks, E.J., Adler, I. and Milton, C., 1959. Electron probe analysis of minute inclusions of a copper-iron mineral. American Mineralogist: Journal of Earth and Planetary Materials, 44(9-10), pp.974-978.
https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/msa/ammin/article/44/9-10/974/541549/Electron-probe-analysis-of-minute-inclusions-of-a
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: probe_ogre on July 27, 2021, 06:07:06 PM
So maybe I'm dating myself a bit, but I cut my teeth on an ARL EMX-SM in grad school and got more into it (literally) at USGS.  Later, the SEMQ, several JEOL models and an SX50.  Everything but a MAC just about.  I think the early Shimadzu's were a take-off (ha!) on the ARL EMX, EMX-SM.

PS-I am new to this forum; am finally getting around to running PFE.  And my name here may show up as "probe ogre" in deference to a title I once had.

Jim McGee
Title: Re: History of EPMA
Post by: John Donovan on July 28, 2021, 09:15:02 AM
So maybe I'm dating myself a bit, but I cut my teeth on an ARL EMX-SM in grad school and got more into it (literally) at USGS.  Later, the SEMQ, several JEOL models and an SX50.  Everything but a MAC just about.  I think the early Shimadzu's were a take-off (ha!) on the ARL EMX, EMX-SM.

PS-I am new to this forum; am finally getting around to running PFE.  And my name here may show up as "probe ogre" in deference to a title I once had.

Jim McGee

Hi Jim,
Welcome to our EPMA user forum!

Very pleased to hear you are finally getting an opportunity to run Probe for EPMA on a modern EPMA instrument.  Just so you know we do offer remote training modules for Probe for EPMA (and EPMA in general) as described in this topic:

https://probesoftware.com/smf/index.php?topic=1297.0

I'll post more on remote training in that topic, but for now you might also want to check out the Shimadzu topic here:

https://probesoftware.com/smf/index.php?topic=1275.0